Churn Monster: Unlucky Customer

Churn Monster #13: Unlucky Customer

 

Customer Churn MonsterToday is Friday the 13th and we all know that means – bad luck, right? Well ironically you are in luck, because in honor of this cursed day, we are releasing a new monster in our churn monster series.

An unlucky churn monster is a customer who bought your product with the best of intentions of being successful in utilizing and adopting it but along the way they have been hit with misfortune and adversity making the likelihood of success much harder.

Let’s take a look at a scenario involving an unlucky churn monster and see what you can do as a Customer Success Manger in this type of situation.

 

The Scenario

You have an introductory call with one of your new customers. They seem like a great fit and are excited to get things going with implementing and rolling out your product. A few months have gone by and you are shocked by the amount of curveballs that have been thrown in the mix since your first welcome call.

It all started with your main POC’s computer crashing, causing them to loose all of the work they had put into filling out the configuration worksheets. That accounted for hours of lost work and created a significant delay in getting those completed and turned over so the configuration process could begin.

Then the day that was chosen to do the data migration from their previous system to your product certainly didn’t happen as planned. There were major outages that day with the other system that made it impossible to pull the data out for import into your platform. The team felt it was necessary to wait to fully understand how their data might have been affected by the outage, which again delayed the deployment process.

And most recently, the week you had planned to do the team onboarding training, had to be canceled because 2/3 of the team had caught the same stomach bug and were out sick.

No matter how hard you’ve been trying to make this customer successful, you’ve been met with obstacles time and time again. You are starting to worry that this customer is cursed and might just give up. What do you do?

Plan of Action

First you start by letting the customer know you are a partner on their side to help get them through all of these unforeseen roadblocks. You also share in a laugh together about just how unlucky they have been, which helps to add levity to the situation.

You also plan to reschedule the onboarding training for two weeks out when hopefully everyone will be back in good health. Furthermore, instead of this being a virtual training you decide to make this an onsite visit to help make it more personal and make sure the team prioritizes this training and uses it as an opportunity to work through some of their use cases together.

And lastly you offer a “restart”, where you have added two free months on to the end of their subscription to help make up for all the lost time with the delayed start. This isn’t typically something that you offer clients, especially if a delay is due to laziness, but you feel like in this case it will be taken as an act of goodwill since they really are eager to get things going and could use the extra time to prove their success.

Fast-forward a few months, and it’s renewal time. You are confident that the customer is in a much better place now and seems to have fended off the initial bad luck. And it turns out you are right. They not only want to renew but what to expand on their subscription with you.

Good job of turning that unlucky churn monster into a happy, successful customer.

Follow the links below to check out the other churn monsters that were previous part of our series.

customer success software churn monster playbookTo learn more about the churn monsters that might be in your closet, download our churn monster playbook, which can be your definitive guide in fighting customer churn.

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Upcoming Webinar

Rethinking Customer Onboarding to Accelerate Success
Wednesday, October 16, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 PM EDT


Speaker: Jason Whitehead

Jason Whitehead, Customer Success MastermindIncreasingly, Customer Success teams talk about helping customers successfully achieve their desired business outcomes, yet they do very little during onboarding to help customers achieve the results they require. Instead, many onboarding efforts are ineffective and often are narrowly focused on the technology itself.

Many of your customers lack the internal knowledge, expertise and infrastructure they need to successfully achieve their business goals using your (or any) software! It is time to boldly revamp your onboarding process to instead focus where your customers struggle the most – developing the capacity to drive internal success on their own.

This webinar presents a proven model that you can use to help customers quickly shift their approach and build their capacity to drive their own internal success with your software.

Join the webinar to learn:

  1. Why most onboarding efforts are ineffective and do not set your customers up for success with your software
  2. Why your customer struggle to achieve their goals and how you can to help them create their own internal success team
  3. Specific tactics you can use to quickly improve your onboarding approach to be a force multiplier in driving customers success, while reduce the workload on your CS team

 

Register Now


Customer Success Around the Web

Fighting Churn is a newsletter of inspiration, ideas and news on customer success, churn, renewal and other stuff and is curated by ChurnZero.

The post Churn Monster: Unlucky Customer appeared first on ChurnZero.

How to Proactively Engage Clients and Automate Your High Touch Service – A Success Story

How to Proactively Engage Clients and Automate Your High Touch Service – A Success Story 

MineralTree logo

MineralTree is a payment platform that helps thousands of business automate their invoice-to-pay process. By cutting out manual tasks and authorizations, the MineralTree platform streamlines the Accounts Payable (AP) needs of financial professionals around the world. 

 

The Challenges  

As a result of their Customer Success team’s rapid growth, the MineralTree  team lacked effective automation. They sought the ability to both monitor and influence their customer’s healthWhile once sufficient, existing  marketing automation and CRM tools no longer met the needs of their CS team.  

The MineralTree Customer Success team faced several distinct challenges: 

  1. They were without a platform to identify accounts that needed extra attention. Furthermore, they lacked the ability to make use of these insights and directly influence a customer’s health scores.
  2. A lack of a centralized workspace increased the chances that client tasks could slip through the cracks. Providing a ‘home base’ was a must for the growing team.
  3. Because the team did not always have a clear view into new client progress, outreach was sometimes felt more reactive than proactive. Eliminating manual and repetitive tasks was essential. 

 

Meeting MineralTree’s Goals  

MineralTree took four steps to add efficiency and meet the goals of their growing CS function: 

Leverage Health Scoring 

  • Creating and using customer health scores allowed the team to access in-depth customer health insights. These enabled the team to take a proactive approach to account management. Best of all this information is now available at a glance – via dedicated dashboards, Salesforce or even Slack. 

Segmented Customer Types 

  • Effortlessly organizing their customers was key to enabling effective account management. Whether dividing accounts based upon their engagement or position in the customer journey, the team is better equipped to recognize trends. 

Automate Previously Manual Tasks 

  • The team has reduced the manual day-to-day tasks and communications that had once filled their days.  This allows the team to focus on what matters most – providing an exceptional customer experience. 

Provide a Centralized CS Workspace 

  • The team found a home in a dedicated Customer Success Workspace. Real-time dashboards and usage reporting provide a powerful home for both CSMs and company leadership. 

 

The Impact 

In just a few months MineralTree’s team realized significant results. Their adoption of a dedicated Customer Success platform has not only streamlined internal processesbut has elevated their entire customer experience: 

  • MineralTree has increased efficiency through the use of automated communications, known as ‘Plays’. This enables the team to deliver high-touch service across all of their accounts, without the need to significantly grow their headcount 
  • Their CS team has found a home in their ‘Customer Success Workplace.’ CSMs can effortless track new client progress across their entire customer lifecycle – all in real time. 
  • Client communications have been both automated and optimized. Better account organization allows the team to marshal their efforts towards the right customer sets or user personas. 


Don’t just take it from us – whether your CS team is new or well-established, consider the gains that a Customer Success platform can provide for your organization.

MineralTree, Customer Success quote

Curious to learn more about how MineralTree increased efficiencies and elevated their customer experience? Read the complete case study here. 

The post How to Proactively Engage Clients and Automate Your High Touch Service – A Success Story appeared first on ChurnZero.

ChurnZero Announces New CCO, CMO, and VP of Sales

ChurnZero Expands Leadership Team to Capitalize on Business Growth and Mission to Bring Customer Success to All Subscription Businesses


ChurnZero Announces New CCO, CMO, and VP of Sales appointments to its leadership team.

 

ChurnZero, a real-time Customer Success platform, announced new appointments of to its leadership team: Abby Hammer as Chief Customer Officer, Hunter Montgomery as Chief Marketing Officer, and Jason Moore as VP of Sales. These executives reflect the company’s focus of capitalizing on the significant business growth and expansion since their Series A raise earlier this year.

“We’ve been growing quickly in the fast-developing Customer Success category and I’m excited about this team we’ve built,” said CEO and Founder, You Mon Tsang. “These three leaders will bring their expertise to support our Customer Success, Product, Marketing and Sales teams, while continuing to drive a customer-centric culture throughout the company.”  

ChurnZero’s new executive appointments strengthen the company’s leadership team with deep experience from top technology companies.

  • Chief Customer OfficerAbby Hammer, CCO: Abby who is a ChurnZero founding team member is joining the C-Suite with a promotion from the VP of Products to the Chief Customer Officer. In her new role, Abby will be responsible for delivering the best customer experience throughout all points of the ChurnZero customer lifecycle. She will drive product strategy and execution as well as lead the Customer Success team who delivers customer implementations and works to drive adoption, engagement and expansion across the ChurnZero platform. Prior to joining ChurnZero, Abby was the Director of Product Management atiContact and Cision (formerly Vocus), leaders in the email marketing, marketing automation and public relations spaces.

 

  • Hunter Montgomery, CMO: Hunter is a highly accomplished global marketing executive with over 25 years of experience in the management and leadership of marketing and business operations. In his role as Chief Marketing Officer at ChurnZero, he will be responsible for overall marketing strategy and will provide direction in positioning and messaging, demand generation, branding, public relations, and partnerships. Prior to ChurnZero, Hunter was the CMO at Higher Logic where he was a member of the original management team and . VP of Marketing at Vocus.

 

  • VP of SalesJason Moore, VP of Sales: Jason is a proven sales leader in the B2B SaaS world with almost 10 years of experience in the leadership and growth of sales teams. Currently at ChurnZero, Jason leads the go-to-market sales and operations team. Most recently, Jason held senior sales roles at Zignal Labs leading the company to double in revenue year over year and before that, Vocus, where he led the growth of award-winning Small Business and Midmarket sales teams.

 

About ChurnZero 

ChurnZero helps subscription businesses fight customer churn. Its software solutions allow businesses to understand how their customers use their product, asses their health and their likelihood to renew, and give businesses the means to personalize the customer experience through timely and relevant touchpoints. ChurnZero is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and is backed by leading angles and venture capital firms such as Baird Capital, Grotech Ventures and Middleland Capital. For more information, visit churnzero.net.

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CSM Confidential – Part 2: Dealing with Internal Challenges

CSM Confidential – Part 2:
Dealing with Internal Challenges

 

Being a Customer Success Manager is difficult enough. 

Based upon the premise that customer support should be more proactive than reactive, the value of CS cannot be understated. Between responsibilities like onboarding, advocacy, upsells and renewals, Customer Success Managers (CSMs) have cemented themselves as drivers of corporate growth. 

That said, thriving in this relatively new discipline is not always easy. Between difficult Account Executives, a lack of executive buy-in and other challenges, being a CSM isn’t always a walk in the park. Wondering how CSMs really feel about some of the intricacies of working in CS?  

Continue on to read our second installment of CSM Confidential – where real-world Customer Success practitioners give their unfiltered responses to some of the most challenging, frustrating and cringeworthy situations that every CSM experiences. 

 

Dealing with a Difficult Account Executive. You Know the One – That Coworker Who Treats Customer Success as Their Personal Secretary. 

 

For a CSM that’s occupied with the day to day requirements of account management, it’s frustrating to deal with an Account Executive who doesn’t respect your time. Whether missing meetings or treating you like a secretary, situations like this aren’t easy to navigate. Is it better to call out a misbehaving AE and hope the message resonates? Or are there softer approaches for dealing with a difficult colleague? 

 

“This was a problem I faced all to often at previous organizations. Difficult Account Executives and a lack of a salesCS partnership is detrimental to everyone. In fact, this can becoma major problem for any organization that’s looking to grow. 

One approach to consider is having new AEs shadow an entire implementation. They key is to get AEs involved from the Kickoff call to the Go-Live date – even if they’re just observing the process. This helps our sales counterparts understand all the work that goes into a successful implementation. It also gives them an idea of the day to day activities we’re involved in to keep our customers happy. 

Giving Account Executives a front row seat to the entire Customer Success process can make all the difference. In my experience it has helped our sales counterparts understand why we are so busy and why we can’t respond to every request.”  

-CSM, Cloud Software Company 

 

Another CS practitioner echoed these comments. They also highlighted the need for mutual understanding and suggest creating a living document that lays out expectations 

 

I find that a difficult AE is typically the result of one or two things… miscommunication or a lack of clear-cut responsibilities. When you’re part of a fast-growing startups, these situations are bound to occur. After all, processes in fast paced environments are frequently made on the fly. Regardless of the specifics, there is some type of disconnect.  

Consider creating a document that can serve as a “source of truth” for your internal Sales and CS operations. This can take lots of forms but most importantly it should outline joint accountabilities and properly manage everyone’s expectations. These issues may just come down to a lack of understanding on an AE’s part – a document like this can go a long way in this situation. 

As a bonus it provides a medium that helps demonstrate exactly why CS is so busy. I’ve found this helpful when fostering mutual respect.” 

-Implementation Specialist, SaaS Startup 

 

Sales and Marketing Have Their Own Budgets… How the Heck Do We Get One? 

 

For a practicing CSM, it can be hard to remember a time where Customer Success wasn’t considered a driver for corporate growth. As the role has matured, more executives have realized that Customer Success is not just glorified support. CS has quickly cemented itself as an essential part of SaaS organizations. 

While it’s hard to dispute the impact of Customer Success, some organizations do struggle with appropriately funding their team. So how do you deal with an executive team who would rather invest in Sales and Marketing? 

 

“Your search for budget should highlight the goals of your CS team and how they can drive success across the entire organization. It’s important to frame additional budget as not only a ‘win’ for customers, but a win for other parts of the company (including Sales and Marketing!) This is where a ‘CS is Everywhere’ mindset can come into play. 

As a start ask yourself: What will additional funding help the CS team do (reduce churn? increase upsells? add efficiency to the team?) Secondly consider how these initiatives line up with your company’s overarching goals (growth, customer satisfaction and so on.) 

Coming armed with stats and a roadmap to success will help make your case. Few executives will say no to an investment that is poised to pay dividends.” 

-CSM, Cloud Software Company 

 

Our second respondent echoed this idea. Don’t just think about what additional budget can do for your team. Rather consider what can it do for the entire organization. 

 

“Regardless of your organization’s size, you’re likely competing with others for budget. This is even more pronounced in larger organizations where budgeting is a long, formal process.  

Many of us [CSMs] are no stranger to this – whether duking it out with our colleagues in support, sales, marketing and other strategic areas, the fight for budget is very real. 

When working to receive (or increase!) your budget, I take three things into consideration: 

  • The Company’s Big Goals (How can CS play into these or help achieve them?) 
  • Who Can be a Champion (Who can act as an internal cheerleader? Is anyone in particular excited about CS tools or procedures?) 
  • How Does CS Positively Impact Other Departments (How does CS support other teams? i.e delivering product recommendations to your Product Team, etc.)

 I’ve found that these are three concepts that help justify the need for a budget – they also fit in nicely with your leadership’s budgeting thought process. In addition, for those who feel threatened by CS, be sure to highlight that CS supplants their efforts – it doesn’t reduce them!” 

-CSM, Cloud Software Company 

 

Responding to Executives Who Don’t Think CS Is Essential: Why Can’t Sales and Marketing Fill the Same Role? 

 

Since Customer Success is relatively new, confusion still exists around the role. It may be tough for those new to CS to understand why Sales and Marketing teams can’t fill the same role. So how do explain how essential Customer Success is? 

 

“Commonly, executives that are not in-tune with the customer-first mentality struggle with the idea of Customer Success as a philosophy and see it as a potentially wasteful business unit. The most important thing is to drive the idea that Customer Success contributes to bottom line of the business – a concept that Executives (and Investors!) understand quite well. 

Remind them that it is much cheaper to retain a customer than bring on a net-new one. While other units within the organization might drive leads (Marketing) and close deals (Sales) – there is a critical third component that leads to massive business expansion – which is expansion of existing customers (Upsells/Cross-Sells) and Referrals to new sales. I would argue that Sales and Marketing do help fill some of the needs – but not all – of the customer. 

This can be achieved by the Customer Success mentality being adopted company wide. The customer experience does not start or stop with one department. Rather, all things must be considered: 

  1. Marketing helps connect the people to the brand. They assist in educating the space, identifying opportunities for teams, and managing a wide array of other customer-facing and public-facing collaterals.
  2. Sales helps to ensure that the customer is a proper fit for the organization. For example, if a customer comes in with a desire to get in the Wall Street Journal by purchasing your product but your solution is a Media Contact Database designed to give them an avenue – it’s up to us as Sales professionals to set proper expectations about what it would take to bridge that gap. (e.g. Providing the data while it is not guaranteed that they get that placement in the Wall Street Journal).
  3. Customer Success ensure that the promises made by Marketing and Sales are absolutely delivered on with your Product and helps to tie the entire experience together by delivering on the customer’s outcomes and goals. By staying close to the customer, intervening at the proper time to ensure they achieve their goals, and refining the process when something looks amiss is what will allow the company to grow 3x, 5x, and 10x. 

Ultimately, Marketing and Sales focus on closing deals. Customer Success focuses on delivering the end-result and ultimate value proposition as quickly and in-line with goals as possible.”

-Customer Success Strategist , Software Startup

 

Another CSM added that taking a conscious approach can make all the differenceAs they explain, when justifying CSdetermine what best appeals to your decision makers. 

 

Winning executive buyin is an ongoing issue for most teams. Sometimes we think about justifying CS as an initial obstacle. This is far for from the truth – gaining buyin is constant process. With changing corporate priorities, along with leadership arrivals and departures, you should always be ready to justify CS’s role.  

While investments in Sales and Marketing are typically a no-brainer, Customer Success is still emerging as a driver of corporate valuation. This problem is particularly apparent when it comes to startup. While budget may be tight, these organizations are often those that can benefit most from Customer Success. A lot of people are still learning the value that CS provides…thankfully the numbers don’t lie. 

CS should always be working to demonstrate their value and differentiate themselves from other teams. This is key to not be thrown into the bucket of “something sales and marketing could just do.” I’ve found that the best way to do this is to figure out how you to appeal to each specific CS doubter.’ Ask yourself – is this executive analytical? revenue oriented? customer oriented? Frame your argument through the lens that appeals most to members of your executive team.”

-CSM, Emerging Technology Company 

 

Internal difficulties can be a formable challenge for both seasoned CS veterans and new CSMs alike. Whether dealing with troublesome account executives or a lack of executive buy in, a calculated approach is a must when dealing with internal challenges. 

While there is never a one-size-fits-all approach to these conversations, take comfort in knowing that CSMs before you (and well into the future!) will experience similar challenges.  

Ready for more unfiltered views on life as a Customer Success Manager? Subscribe to the Fighting Churn Blog and stay tuned for our next installment of CSM Confidential, or check out part one of the series if you missed it. 


Upcoming Webinar

How to Build Effective Customer Success Plans
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 PM EDT


Speaker: Jackie Golden, CEO, LandNExpand

Every Customer Success Plan has a secret sauce that turns it from just a plan on paper to something a team can actually execute and deliver successfully. CS Plans should consist of the right balance of touch points, type of touch points and specific high value outcomes that guide customers along their roadmap to being fully entrenched and engaged with your solution.

Join this session to learn how to:

  • Identify the high value problems your customers have that your solution can solve
  • Track the progress your customers have made towards solving these problems with your solution
  • Uncover additional high value problems the customer should be considering that you can solve for them
  • Deliver high value outcomes that create hard ROI and real impact on your customers’ business

Register Now


Customer Success Around the Web

Fighting Churn is a newsletter of inspiration, ideas and news on customer success, churn, renewal and other stuff and is curated by ChurnZero.

The post CSM Confidential – Part 2: Dealing with Internal Challenges appeared first on ChurnZero.

ChurnZero Named 2019 SaaS Awards Winner

ChurnZero Named 2019 SaaS Awards Winner: Best SaaS Product for Customer Services/CRM


Global Software Awards Program Announces Final Winners

 

SaaS Awards - Best Customer Services/CRMChurnZero is a winner in the 2019 SaaS Awards Program in the category, Best SaaS Product for Customer Services/CRM.

The Software-as-a-Service Awards celebrate excellence in cloud-based software solutions, accepting entries from across the world, including the US, Canada, Australasia, UK and EMEA.

Categories for the 2019 awards program include Best Enterprise-Level SaaS Product, Best Data-Driven SaaS Product and Best Security Innovation in a SaaS Product. New vertical-specific categories include Best SaaS for Catering and Hospitality.

You Mon Tsang, CEO and Founder said: “It was a great honor for ChurnZero to make the shortlist for Best SaaS Product for Customer Services/CRM, but to win the category against such a high standard of competition demonstrates our clear dedication to talent, innovation and success.”

SaaS Awards and Cloud Awards organizer Larry Johnson said: “Another year, another shortlist giving our judges a Herculean challenge.

“With so many potential winners for each category, we hope our choices showcase the thrilling diversity of today’s SaaS offerings – from established incumbents to disruptive start-ups, across the entire globe.

“For any organization which missed out on the 2019 SaaS Awards, there is now a pressing October deadline for the 2019-20 Cloud Awards recognition platform.”

The SaaS Awards is now closed for entries and will reopen for 2020 submissions later in the year. Over 200 organizations entered, with international entries coming from North America, Canada, Australia, UK, Europe and the Middle East. To view the shortlist and list of winners, please visit: https://www.cloud-awards.com/2019-saas-shortlist/

Best SaaS Product for Customer Services / CRM

  • Chorus.ai
  • ChurnZero (WINNER)
  • RingCentral
  • Stella Connect
  • ContactEngine
  • Zingle
  • NICE inContact
  • AccountancyManager
  • Ada
  • TCN, Inc.
  • Five9
  • Totango
  • AccuLynx
  • Zipwhip

 

About the SaaS Awards

The SaaS Awards is a sister program to the Cloud Awards, which was founded in 2011. The SaaS Awards focuses on recognizing excellence and innovation in software solutions.

About the Cloud Awards

The Cloud Awards is an international program which has been recognizing and honoring industry leaders, innovators and organizational transformation in cloud computing since 2011. The awards are open to large, small, established and start-up organizations from across the entire globe, with an aim to find and celebrate the pioneers who will shape the future of the Cloud. Categories include the Software as a Service award, Most Promising Start-Up, and “Best in Mobile” Cloud Solution.

Finalists are selected by a judging panel of international industry experts. For more information about the Cloud Awards and SaaS Awards, please visit https://www.cloud-awards.com/.

                                                                         

About ChurnZero

ChurnZero helps subscription businesses fight customer churn. Its software solutions allow businesses to understand how their customers use their product, asses their health and their likelihood to renew, and give businesses the means to personalize the customer experience through timely and relevant touchpoints. ChurnZero is headquartered in Arlington, VA and is backed by leading angles and venture capital firms such as Baird Capital, Grotech Ventures and Middleland Capital. For more information, visit churnzero.net.

The post ChurnZero Named 2019 SaaS Awards Winner appeared first on ChurnZero.

Top 10 Customer Success Takeaways from SaaStr Scale

Top 10 Customer Success Takeaways from SaaStr Scale

SaaStr Scale

Yesterday, ChurnZero had the opportunity to attend and sponsor a brand new SaaStr event called – SaaStr Scale. It was a 1-day turbo-charged event in San Francisco with the best-of-the-best in Sales, Marketing, and Customer Success. The programing was packed with 15+ hands-on “The Playbook To” session from top CROs, CMOs, and CCOs, all with the focus of helping you to scale faster.

Our very own CEO, You Mon Tsang, had a part of the action and was one of the conference mentors and organized a Super Braindate on – Customer Success for the C-Suite: Why Churn Matters. In this session, You Mon led the discussion around why churn is the number one enemy against scaling your SaaS business (other than your culture and leadership).

We believe that now more than ever it’s imperative that corporate leaders set a high standard in their commitment to Customer Success, and this one metric (churn) is essential to any growing SaaS organization.

We are happy to say it was a great event all around. No worries if you weren’t able to attend  (or even if you did and are looking for a recap), we have pulled together our top takeaways from SaaStr Scale that we wanted to share with you here.

 

1.) [Video] All of Your SaaS Questions Answered


2.) No Surprises!

 

3.) Respect Your Customer

 

4.) Focus on Retention 

 

5.) Split out Sales and Account Management 

 

6.) 73% of Consumers Rate Customer Experiences as an Important Factor in Buying Decisions 

 

7.) Align Your Work to Company Goals

 

8.) Incentivize Longer Term Contracts

 

9.) Invest in Your Customer Reference Program 

 

10.) Pay Attention to Net Promoter Score (NPS)

 

We hope you found that to be a valuable recap of our favorite takeaways from SaaStr Scale, and we cannot wait to see you all at SaaStr Annual 2020!


Upcoming Webinar

How to Build Effective Customer Success Plans
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 PM EDT


Speaker: Jackie Golden, CEO, LandNExpand

Every Customer Success Plan has a secret sauce that turns it from just a plan on paper to something a team can actually execute and deliver successfully. CS Plans should consist of the right balance of touch points, type of touch points and specific high value outcomes that guide customers along their roadmap to being fully entrenched and engaged with your solution.

Join this session to learn how to:

  • Identify the high value problems your customers have that your solution can solve
  • Track the progress your customers have made towards solving these problems with your solution
  • Uncover additional high value problems the customer should be considering that you can solve for them
  • Deliver high value outcomes that create hard ROI and real impact on your customers’ business

Register Now


Customer Success Around the Web

Fighting Churn is a newsletter of inspiration, ideas and news on customer success, churn, renewal and other stuff and is curated by ChurnZero.

The post Top 10 Customer Success Takeaways from SaaStr Scale appeared first on ChurnZero.

How to Increase Your CS Team’s Efficiencies and Reduce Client Onboarding Time – A Success Story

How to Increase Your CS Team’s Efficiencies and Reduce Client Onboarding Time – A Success Story

Inflow Communications

Inflow Communications is one of the nation’s top Unified Communications and Contact Center providers. As a pioneer in contact center and customer experience technologies, Inflow Communications provides training and consulting to hundreds of customers around the world.  

The Challenges  

With their CS team starting from the ground up, the Inflow Communications team lacked established processes. This challenge was even more pronounced as existing tools took a one-size-fits-all approach. Since the company’s needs were not those of a typical SaaS organization, prospective solutions fell short. 

The Inflow Communications Customer Success team faced three distinct challenges: 

  1. The team spent much of their time carrying out time intensive and repetitive tasks. While once manageable, these efforts proved challenging as Inflow continued to grow their customer base 
  2. Their existing onboarding process proved inefficient. This legacy process relied upon manual inputs and required CSMs to spend much of their time chasing clients or fielding replies. 
  3. A centralized Customer Success workplace did not exist. The team relied on dispersed data across several platform. A ‘home base’ where CSMs could track their customer’s health and journeys was a must. 

 

Meeting Inflow’s Goals  

Inflow Communications took four steps to add efficiency and meet the goals of their growing CS team: 

Leverage Segmentation 

  • Segmenting customer accounts allowed the team to effortlessly organize and target their customers. This allows for the CS team to marshal their efforts towards the right customer types and user personas. 

Enable Proactive Account Management 

  • NPS and Health Scores have allowed the team to move away from a reactive approach to account management. These powerful insights have made the Inflow team ready to respond to any customer challenge.  

Automate Once Manual Tasks 

  • The team reduced previously manual tasks by leveraging using robust automation. By automating common tasks and communications, the team is freed up to provide high-touch service to their most valuable accounts. 

Provide a Centralized CS Workspace 

  • The entire Customer Success team found a home in a dedicated Customer Success Workspace. Real-time dashboards and usage reporting provide a powerful home for Inflow’s growing team. This ensures that the team never misses a beat. 

 

The Impact 

In less than 6 months Inflow Communications achieved significant results. While any implementation takes a surprising amount of work, the outcome was well worth it: 

  • Inflow Communications increased proactive customer messaging by 400%. Plays and Journeys enabled the automation of previously manual tasks. 
  • Tools like NPS and Health Scores enhanced the CS team’s customer visibility. This enables proactive engagement of accounts that show signs of slipping health.  
  • Onboarding time has been reduced by over 50%. CSMs can effortlessly track new client progress across the entire onboarding process – all in real time. 


Don’t just take it from us – whether your CS team is new or well-established, consider the gains that a Customer Success platform can provide 
for your team.  

quote, Enterprise Customer Success

Curious to learn more about how Inflow Communications increased efficiencies and elevated their customer experience? Read the complete case study here. 

The post How to Increase Your CS Team’s Efficiencies and Reduce Client Onboarding Time – A Success Story appeared first on ChurnZero.

ChurnZero Leads G2’s Momentum Report for Customer Success Software

ChurnZero Leads G2’s Summer 2019 Momentum Report for Customer Success Software


Out of 13 solution providers included in G2’s Summer 2019 Momentum Report for Customer Success Software, ChurnZero has received the highest Momentum Score, based on execptional customer satisfaction and market growth, reinforcing ChurnZero’s position as the pacesetter int the Customer Success industry.

The new Customer Success Software Momentum Grid from G2 showcases CS solutions with the highest growth trajectory on a product’s user satisfaction, online presence, and employee headcount growth over the last year.

Given the rapid pace of innovation and change in technology markets, today’s B2B buyer needs to have a forward-looking perspective when it comes to purchasing new business solutions.

The G2 Momentum Score is based on two factors: 1) Market Momentum (Y-axis) and 2) User Satisfaction (x-axis). A product’s Momentum Score is calculated by a proprietary algorithm that factors in social, web, employee and review data that G2 has deemed influential in a company’s momentum.

The Satisfaction Score is based on end-user satisfaction with the product, popularity, statistical significance (number of G2 reviews), quality of reviews receives, age of reviews, overall customer satisfaction, and Net Promoter Score on G2.

The two scores combined to give ChurnZero an overall score of 94, beating out the next highest Customer Success provider by 29 points.

“We’re driven every day to get better through authentic, unbiased customer feedback,” says Abby Hammer, ChurnZero’s Chief Customer Officer. “G2 has created the leading channel for transparent user reviews, and that makes it even more rewarding to earn this recognition.

Customer Success Software Momentum Report Grid

To find out why our customers rate us so highly and understand the impact we can bring to your subscription business, sign up for a live demo today. 

Get a Live Demo

 

About G2 (formerly G2 Crowd)

Headquartered in Chicago, G2.com is revolutionising the way businesses discover, buy and manage software and services. More than three million users per month rely on G2.com to help them find and buy the best software for their businesses. The platform has 750,000 reviews, and $100M in total funding invested by IVP, Accel Partners, LinkedIn, Emergence Capital, Pritzker Group, Chicago Ventures, Hyde Park Ventures, industry leaders and founders. G2.com’s most recent funding, a $55M Series C, was announced in October. The company’s first acquisition, Siftery, was announced in December 2018 following its Series C funding.

                                                                         

About ChurnZero

ChurnZero helps subscription businesses fight customer churn. Its software solutions allow businesses to understand how their customers use their product, asses their health and their likelihood to renew, and give businesses the means to personalize the customer experience through timely and relevant touchpoints. ChurnZero is headquartered in Arlington, VA and is backed by leading angles and venture capital firms such as Baird Capital, Grotech Ventures and Middleland Capital. For more information, visit churnzero.net.

The post ChurnZero Leads G2’s Momentum Report for Customer Success Software appeared first on ChurnZero.

Q&A: Why It’s Time to Build a CS Ops Role in Your Organization

Q&A: Why It’s Time to Build a ‘CS Ops’ Role in Your Organization

 

Much like the evolution within the Sales team and the creation of “Sales Ops”, Customer Success is on a similar trajectory. It is becoming vitally important to drive successful outcomes for your customers (i.e. Customer Success) and it is even more critical to build out “Customer Success Operations”.

To talk about this newer role and shed some light on the evolution of Customer Success Operations and how it can impact SaaS businesses, we hosted a well-attended webinar earlier this week with Jason Conrad from the Customer Imperative. During this session we hit on several key topics including:

  • How to define the ‘CS Ops’ role
  • What’s it like to drive transformative change to internal processes
  • What types of metrics should this role be responsible for
  • How can systems and tools empower your customer teams

No worries if you missed the live webcast (or even if you want to view it again), you can do so on-demand here.

During the webcast we conducted three audience polls to get a gauge on where attendees were in terms of their Customer Success operations today. Where do you fall? Do you relate to others in these regards?

We also engaged in a great Q&A session with the presenter, that we wanted to share with you here.

Q&A Recap

Speaker: Jason Conrad, Associate Partner, Customer Imperative

 

Q: In this presentation the mature Customer Success org had of Customer Success Ops role. There was also mentioned of combining Revenue, Marketing, Sales, Customer Success ops to one team. Where should the operations role sit in this combined world?

A: That’s a great question. And for anyone who might need a refresher on that topic. We discussed about how some companies have Sales Ops, Marketing Ops and maybe they have a Revenue Officer and Customer Success Ops, and I really believe that it should be one function if you want to move faster.

So, the question is where does that live if it’s one function and it really depends on how your executive team is structured. You want it to be owned by whoever owns revenue is the shortest answer. I think that the person that owns the revenue number at the executive team level is the one that’s going to be able to get things done the quickest. We do have some very strategic and incredible Chief Customer Officers out there who might be paired along side with the Chief Revenue Officer. However, I still believe that the Chief Revenue Officer should own what is needed to drive that revenue.

The ops team is equally important and having them together can really create a ton of efficiency and just lets you move faster.

 

Q: If there is no headcount for a new CS ops person, what’s the best way to incorporate the function until you can get budget?

A: That’s another great question. So, I think there’s the question there and then there’s an inherent question, kind of a hidden question, which is- if we don’t have budget, what do we do? The first thing I would say is, we presented a lot of different idea today and why? I think that the reason that this team is invested in early is because you’re generally investing in the must-haves, you have to have Customer Success Managers. You have to have Implementation Consultants. So often times, it is something that has an investment in later stages.

Then what I’ve seen companies do is really look at their customer strategy first. Developing a customer strategy ideally is something that you should be able to get executive level buy in on and if you work to develop a customer strategy cross-functionally with your CEO or Chief Product Officer or your CMO or your head of Sales, you should be able to look at what are the most important initiatives that you need to put in place to get the work done.

And then I think it’ll be apparent that there might not be anybody there to help with those strategic initiatives. So, building a business case is really the important part first.

If you don’t have anyone in place, you can still get work done through this concept with the customer strategy team and the customer initiative team. It is a drain and you do have to acknowledge that ultimately a VP of Customer Success does not own process automation and a CSM does not own data and systems, but you can still get work done. You can have a customer strategy tam that’s comprised of leaders and then create an initiative SWAT team. I have seen CSMs, Implementation Consultants, Product Manager, roll up their sleeves and dive in on projects. The important part there is make sure that you’re choosing low effort, high-impact initiatives to do. Don’t try to bite off things that are high effort, high impact, because you just won’t be able to get them done. So, it’s all about prioritization and picking things that you think you can actually get done on a quarterly basis. So, time box it. Say- in the next 90 days we’re going to implement an NPS process. Involve product, involve a representative CSM, involve marketing, create a SWAT team and get it done. But don’t do anything else other than servicing your customers and selling.

 

Q: I know you mentioned tying Customer Success Operations goals to revenue goals. What other goals or metrics do you recommend for CS Ops?

A: So, what I had said was, you should look at gross retention and net retention. I’ll tell you what, I wouldn’t tie them to. You don’t want to tie them to metrics that sometimes are impacted by a really wide variety of uncontrollable environments and scenarios such as NPS. I would not tie anybody’s pay to NPS. There’s so much that goes into that. There’s who’s your audience? Who are the customers? What was the sales process? What was the implementation like? What’s the product experience like? Don’t do that. You can look at tying them to some component of revenue as well as some component of personal performance measures.

A lot of HR teams will really like to see that you are tying them to exhibiting progress against company goals. You can tie them to a performance rating if you want. I’m not saying that they should be 100% tied to revenue on their incentive. Some companies we work with do say your base is your base and your bonus is tied to gross or net revenue retention. I think that most tend to have a split of maybe hey do it half on revenue and had on a more subjective performance rating.

 

Q: How do you delineate the strategic responsibilities between a Director of Customer Success and a Director of Success Ops?

A: This is a great question. I believe a Director of Customer Success is the leadership team member that ultimately owns the revenue number, or they own paving the way for the revenue number and I’m not talking about bookings. I’m talking about ongoing revenue renewals. The Director of Customer Success or the VP of Customer Success is also meant to be a leader from a team perspective. So, they are meant to create the culture the environment, create the talent development process that really allows you to have world-class Customer Success Managers. They’re also responsible for managing day-to-day operations. So, that means they’re responsible for jumping in and helping the team when there’s an escalation. They’re responsible for being that executive point of contact for key Accounts.

Customer Success Operations is execution. Customer Success Ops is strategic initiatives related to people, data, process, and systems. The work of a VP of Customer Success is more durable. It’s something that in general doesn’t change year to year. Maybe the projects you’re working on do but the motions and the responsibilities don’t. Customer Success Ops is agile execution of initiatives that need to push your customer experience forward.

 

Q: Would CS Ops roles typically have any customer contact, or would it purely be internal execution?

A: You don’t want to have your Customer Success Ops being client-facing and the reason I say that is because you have your Customer Success Manger for that. You really want your CS Ops individual to be focused on initiatives focused on building process, adding technology, and automating.

I have seen Directors of CS Ops participate in different customer interactions that help them get more empathy for the customer experience. So, if you’re a company that is good at doing product discovery or customer discovery, maybe you’re interviewing customers consistently on how they use the product or what their challenges are in being successful int their roles or maybe talking to them about their experience with your company. You can involve then, and I do recommend that, just have them be a silent participant.

The company I mentioned earlier that has a really amazing Director of Customer Success Operation, he sits in on a lot of NPS follow-up calls. Just as a reminder if you’re getting NPS comments, you should be following up on each and every one of them. Especially the ones that say I’m unhappy with XYZ. You want to call those people and talk to them and that’s a great opportunity for your Ops tam to sit in and listen so they can start to think about solutions for some of the problems your customers are having.

 

Q: What other roles have you seen the CS Ops role have under them? Do they have any direct reports?

A: Yea, so the company I worked at, Snag, was a good example of this. So, we had a Chief Revenue Officer who owned new logo bookings as well as revenue. So, he owned all of our Customer Success Managers. We had a pretty strong operations function. It started with Sales Ops and Revenue Ops including a component of CS Ops. We had a Director of Revenue Operations and he had three analysts one was focused on sales. So they were doing things like, if we acquired a list of prospective accounts, or if we had to change territory alignment that person was looking at CRM data around that. We had a Revenue Ops analyst who was working on the metrics that we needed around understanding our customer segments. They worked on LTV to CAC by product, LTV to CAC by customer segments, by size. And then we had a Customer Success Operations Analyst that really owned the systems that drove our proactive Customer Success.  

For example, if you got a ChurnZero type platform in place that’s helping you with customer health scoring or automated customer engagements, that person focused there. We were a bigger company and if you think about that continuum, I showed we were towards the right of that where we had the need to have three different analysts that focused on different parts of customer operations, and we eventually folded Marketing Ops into that as well.

So, in general I would try to think about the size of your company and then what the needs of your organization are in terms of efficiency.

 

Q: Do you think that CSM onboarding would fall under CS Ops at all, or would that be up to another manager?

A: I think that CS Ops has a responsibility in CSM onboarding so they should be developing with the head of Customer Success the CSM onboarding plan. They should be tracking that onboarding is being done efficiently and that we’re taking care of our new team members. If you look at a Sales Ops team, a lot of times that falls into the sales enablement bucket. So, I’ve got one of my best friends is a Director of Sales Enablement and a big part of his role is ensuring that after a new hire and Sales goes through the HR training of things like how do you use your email, what are the company policies then they’re going through- how do I be successful as a Sales rep, how do I use outreach tools, how do I use Salesforce, what’s my territory. I think that the same responsibilities sit on the CS Ops Manager/Director.

 

Q: Have you seen CS Ops roles skew to more low-touch companies or high-touch at all? Or can it be in both?

A: I can speak to this at the benefit in a previous job of working for a company that had a very low ACV, high transactional customer segments. We were ideally closing two to three hundred deals a month in that segment. But we also went the whole way up to mega Enterprise world where we had six to twelve-month deal cycles, and we had account teams of three to four chasing after really big whale multi-million-dollar accounts. So, we needed Customer Success Ops in both segments.

We think about a Marketing Ops Team if you have a SMB kind of go-to-market business, they are focusing on lead generation and scales. They’re doing a lot of marketing automation. They’re doing a lot of campaign that are generating top of the funnel activity versus a Marketing Ops function that’s working for a very Enterprise business is doing a lot more Account Based Marketing. So, they’re thinking about what the accounts are and who are the people that we need to engage at those accounts and how do we become very targeted. The same applies to CS Ops. It is 100% necessary on both sides.

There are so many companies I work with that just have no customer engagement. We worked with a company recently that had about twelve thousand customers and I think two Customer Success Managers. So how in the heck are you supposed to have any touch point with those customers? It’s not even possible to do a yearly touch point at that level. So, investing in automation for customers is very important, but it’s also very important if you have a very large customer to make sure that you’re doing more account based customer engagement because that’s where you get into more complex stakeholder relationships. You might have hidden decision makers that you don’t know about that you need help developing plans to get to and the answer is yes, it’s needed at both ends of the spectrum and I’ve seen it applies equally in all segments.

 

Q: I am my company’s first CS Ops hire and preciously works as a CSM. What processes should I prioritize first and any other recommendations you would share?

A: Yea, great question and welcome to the team and congratulations! I’ll say first follow me on LinkedIn. I’m going to post these slides on my LinkedIn account. So, there’s a lot of good information in there. There’s a process slide in there that you can use as your prioritization checklist. The number one thing you need to do is make sure that you have proactive renewal process.

So, start with the basics, what is your role. Your role is to enable Customer Success efficiency, If you’re the first Customer Success Ops higher, the first thing I would do is look at how proactive your team is being with renewals and that doesn’t mean that they’re picking up the phone and saying hi, are you going to renew this year. Obviously, we don’t do that all the time. But do you have some sort of a plan to measure account health? Do you have a plan to engage with the customer six months out from renewal, 90 days till renewal? Do you even have the renewal date in Salesforce? I would start with the renewal process and go from there and move on to the customer experience.

 

Q: How much data should a CSM be held accountable for? Are we suggesting having the CS Ops role handle all of the data needs for the team?

A: The CS Ops team should be building the structure and the process to help automate. They should be helping the CSMs life be easier. The CSM needs to be responsible for updating their account list. So, as a CSM, you need to be able to update account health scores, you need to be able to document your interactions. If CS Ops can help you be more efficient with that like for example, if you use some sort of tool to automate your outreach to your customers, I can see CS Ops help integrate that back to your CRM, so you’ve got a history or an audit trail when the last time you touched them. That’s a good example of how they work together.

But ultimately, you’ve got to work together the CS Ops team needs to be focusing on saving the CSM time. But the CSM needs to be collecting, gathering and entering data into the CRM or CS platform that you can actually put that process to good use.

 

Q: Before we close out, any last tips for trying to advocate for a Customer Success Operations role that you would like to highlight?

A: I think I what I would highlight is I know that this role is newer. Thin about starting small if you’re a smaller business and you don’t have this operations role at all. Think about what are the biggest needs that you have? What are the lowest effort highest impact things that you could put in place and think about carving out one person for the team? I would also think about what kind of technology you can use to automate this as well. But I would recommend you don’t try to go down the path of implementing technology unless you know you’ve got investment on the resources side to handle if your VP of Customer Success is not the best person to be administering systems.

So just think about the investment versus the ROI and don’t forget- 1% increase in retention can have a 12% increase in company valuation over a couple year. So, the investment I guarantee will pay off.  

 

To hear more on how you should think about implementing this Customer Success Operations role at your organization, take a listen to the webcast on-demand.

View On-Demand


Upcoming Webinar

How to Build Effective Customer Success Plans
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 PM EDT


Speaker: Jackie Golden, CEO, LandNExpand

Every Customer Success Plan has a secret sauce that turns it from just a plan on paper to something a team can actually execute and deliver successfully. CS Plans should consist of the right balance of touch points, type of touch points and specific high value outcomes that guide customers along their roadmap to being fully entrenched and engaged with your solution.

Join this session to learn how to:

  • Identify the high value problems your customers have that your solution can solve
  • Track the progress your customers have made towards solving these problems with your solution
  • Uncover additional high value problems the customer should be considering that you can solve for them
  • Deliver high value outcomes that create hard ROI and real impact on your customers’ business

Register Now


Customer Success Around the Web

Fighting Churn is a newsletter of inspiration, ideas and news on customer success, churn, renewal and other stuff and is curated by ChurnZero.

The post Q&A: Why It’s Time to Build a CS Ops Role in Your Organization appeared first on ChurnZero.

Ready for Vacation? 4 Tips to Help Every CSM Relax & Disconnect

Customer Success Manager - Vacation Tips

Author: Alexander Weihmann


As a member of the ChurnZero team, I’m lucky enough to work only a few desks away from our Customer Success Managers (CSMs). Summer vacation mode is in full swing, and many of my colleagues have planned trips to destinations near and far. It’s safe to say that members of our Customer Success (CS) team are ready to enjoy some well-deserved time off.
 

Given that we work in the fast-paced world of CS, I started to reflect on this: How do ChurnZero’s CSMs juggle onboarding, renewals and general account upkeep when they’re out of the office? Especially since it can already feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day to begin with. 

Are you gearing up to trade in your office cubicle for a beachside cabana? Here are four tips from ChurnZero to ensure your vacation goes off without a hitch. 

 

Tip 1: Plan Ahead 

Planning is nothing new for CSMs and is essential for long-term success. Customer Success is always looking to the future – whether monitoring upcoming renewals, or carrying out long, complex implementations…. it’s important to plan ahead! 

The same approach should be applied when preparing for vacation time. In a relationship-oriented field like Customer Success, planning ahead will ensure that disruptions are kept to a minimum. As exciting as it can be to add a vacation to your calendar, this is only the starting point. As you prepare for your trip, you should also be sure to consider what potential issues could arise in your absence and determine who on your team would best handle the responsibilities involved in resolving these issues. 

Think of your planning as a multi-step process. This should not just prepare you for the time that you will be out of the office. Effective planning should also allow you to easily adjust when you return to work. Be sure to map out any meetings, appointments or deadlines that will occur during your vacation. Avoid falling victim to the habit of just bumping meetings and deadlines to the following week – this will create a backlog of back-to-back appointments and will make your transition from sand to spreadsheets much more difficult! 

 

Tip 2: Delegate 

Delegating your tasks appropriately will ensure that your time out of the office is as smooth as possible – especially should any customer needs arise while you are out. Remember that delegation is only effective when done appropriately. Similarly, keep in mind that not every task lends itself to delegation. 

As a start, avoid delegating your day-to-day tasks on a whim. Be sure to determine the best point-of-contact for each type of customer situation. Also be aware of how specific tasks play into your colleagues’ strengths. For example, your implementation manager is unlikely the best POC for customers that are far along in their user journey.  

When delegating, ensure that your colleagues feel involved with responsibilities you have given them. Frame the tasks in a way that instills a sense of ownership for those who are picking up your slack. This helps ensure that your tasks are completed efficiently and completely. Most importantly, don’t forget to pass it forward and help your vacationing colleagues when they are out of the office! 

 

Tip 3: Effectively Communicate 

Requesting time off and setting your ‘Out of Office’ is one of the most exciting aspects of vacation planning – your vacation is now official! That said, effectively communicating your time out of the office requires a few more steps than just adding it to your calendar 

When making your final preparations, ensure that all stakeholders are aware of your time off – not just your manager. A good rule of thumb is to provide at least one month of notice. Everyone needs time to prepare for your absence, your coworkers included. Remember – these will be the people you’ll be counting on to support you while you are out! 

The same approach of at least one month notice also applies to external stakeholders. Be sure to notify any customers or third parties that you interact with in your day-to-day. Not only will they appreciate the heads up, but you’ll be less likely to be pulled away from your vacation time to respond to any pressing needs. 

Protip: Organizing your inbox pre-vacation can be a lifesaver. Besides returning to a ‘clean’ workspace, you’ll be doing yourself a favor. It will be a lot harder to find that email with product feedback after a few days away from the office! 

 

Tip 4: Just Do It 

While this isn’t the intended use of Nike’s world-famous slogan, one of the most important tips for relaxing and disconnecting on vacation is to ‘Just Do It.’ For a role like CSM that prides itself on being a trusted client partner, this can be a struggle. Proper preparation should let you feel confident in your ability to shut down and fully enjoy your time off. 

By planning ahead, properly delegating any ‘to-dos’, and effectively communicating with both internal and external stakeholders, you’ll be more than ready for your vacation. While it may feel strange, you should savor your time away from your daily routine. After all, vacations tend to fly by! 

 

Looking for more Customer Success content and views, tips and tricks for Customer Success Managers? Subscribe to ChurnZero’s Fighting Churn blog to stay up to date with all things CS. 


Upcoming Webinar

Why It’s Time to Build a ‘CS Ops’ Role
Wednesday, August 21, 2019
2:00 – 3:00 PM EDT


Speaker: Jason Conrad, Associate Partner, Customer Imperative

Much like the evolution within the Sales team and the creation of “Sales Ops”, Customer Success is on a similar trajectory. It is becoming vitally important to drive successful outcomes for your customers (i.e. Customer Success) and it is even more critical to build out “Customer Success Operations”.

In this webinar, Jason will talk about the evolution of Customer Success Operations and how it can impact SaaS businesses. We’ll look to hit on several key topics including:

  • How to define the ‘CS Ops’ role
  • What’s it like to drive transformative change to internal processes
  • What types of metrics should this role be responsible for
  • How can systems and tools empower your customer teams

Register Now


Customer Success Around the Web

Fighting Churn is a newsletter of inspiration, ideas and news on customer success, churn, renewal and other stuff and is curated by ChurnZero.

The post Ready for Vacation? 4 Tips to Help Every CSM Relax & Disconnect appeared first on ChurnZero.